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Gene Ontology Classifications
Symbol
Name
ID
Tlr4
toll-like receptor 4
MGI:96824

Go Annotations as Summary Text (Tabular View) (GO Graph)

GO curators for mouse genes have assigned the following annotations to the gene product of Tlr4. (This text reflects annotations as of Thursday, July 24, 2014.)
Summary from NCBI RefSeq


[Summary is not available for the mouse gene. This summary is for the human ortholog.] The protein encoded by this gene is a member of the Toll-like receptor (TLR) family which plays a fundamental role in pathogen recognition and activation of innate immunity. TLRs are highly conserved from Drosophila to humans and share structural and functional similarities. They recognize pathogen-associated molecular patterns that are expressed on infectious agents, and mediate the production of cytokines necessary for the development of effective immunity. The various TLRs exhibit different patterns of expression. This receptor has been implicated in signal transduction events induced by lipopolysaccharide (LPS) found in most gram-negative bacteria. Mutations in this gene have been associated with differences in LPS responsiveness. Multiple transcript variants encoding different isoforms have been found for this gene. [provided by RefSeq, Jan 2012]
Summary text based on GO annotations supported by experimental evidence in mouse
Summary text based on GO annotations supported by experimental evidence in other organisms
Summary text based on GO annotations supported by structural data
Summary text for additional MGI annotations
References
  1. Bihl F et al. (2001) LPS-hyporesponsiveness of mnd mice is associated with a mutation in Toll-like receptor 4. Genes Immun, 2:56-9. (PubMed:11294571)
  2. Chang M et al. (2009) Peli1 facilitates TRIF-dependent Toll-like receptor signaling and proinflammatory cytokine production. Nat Immunol, 10:1089-95. (PubMed:19734906)
  3. Fierer J et al. (2002) The role of lipopolysaccharide binding protein in resistance to Salmonella infections in mice. J Immunol, 168:6396-403. (PubMed:12055258)
  4. Gonzalez-Navajas JM et al. (2010) TLR4 signaling in effector CD4+ T cells regulates TCR activation and experimental colitis in mice. J Clin Invest, 120:570-81. (PubMed:20051628)
  5. He YW et al. (2004) The extracellular matrix protein mindin is a pattern-recognition molecule for microbial pathogens. Nat Immunol, 5:88-97. (PubMed:14691481)
  6. Kim HM et al. (2007) Crystal structure of the TLR4-MD-2 complex with bound endotoxin antagonist Eritoran. Cell, 130:906-17. (PubMed:17803912)
  7. Kim YG et al. (2008) The cytosolic sensors Nod1 and Nod2 are critical for bacterial recognition and host defense after exposure to Toll-like receptor ligands. Immunity, 28:246-57. (PubMed:18261938)
  8. Marta M et al. (2008) Unexpected regulatory roles of TLR4 and TLR9 in experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis. Eur J Immunol, 38:565-75. (PubMed:18203139)
  9. O'Connell RM et al. (2005) Immune activation of type I IFNs by Listeria monocytogenes occurs independently of TLR4, TLR2, and receptor interacting protein 2 but involves TNFR-associated NF kappa B kinase-binding kinase 1. J Immunol, 174:1602-7. (PubMed:15661922)
  10. Ogata H et al. (2000) The toll-like receptor protein RP105 regulates lipopolysaccharide signaling in B cells. J Exp Med, 192:23-9. (PubMed:10880523)
  11. Ohashi K et al. (2000) Cutting edge: heat shock protein 60 is a putative endogenous ligand of the toll-like receptor-4 complex. J Immunol, 164:558-61. (PubMed:10623794)
  12. Olson JK et al. (2004) Microglia initiate central nervous system innate and adaptive immune responses through multiple TLRs. J Immunol, 173:3916-24. (PubMed:15356140)
  13. Poltorak A et al. (2001) A point mutation in the il-12rbeta2 gene underlies the il-12 unresponsiveness of lps-defective c57bl/10sccr mice. J Immunol, 167:2106-11. (PubMed:11489994)
  14. Shim JH et al. (2005) TAK1, but not TAB1 or TAB2, plays an essential role in multiple signaling pathways in vivo. Genes Dev, 19:2668-81. (PubMed:16260493)
  15. Stahl AL et al. (2006) Lipopolysaccharide from enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli binds to platelets through TLR4 and CD62 and is detected on circulating platelets in patients with hemolytic uremic syndrome. Blood, 108:167-76. (PubMed:16514062)
  16. Takeuchi O et al. (1999) Differential roles of TLR2 and TLR4 in recognition of gram-negative and gram-positive bacterial cell wall components. Immunity, 11:443-51. (PubMed:10549626)
  17. Takeuchi O et al. (2000) Cellular responses to bacterial cell wall components are mediated through MyD88-dependent signaling cascades. Int Immunol, 12:113-7. (PubMed:10607756)
  18. Vogel SN et al. (1999) Cutting edge: functional characterization of the effect of the C3H/HeJ defect in mice that lack an Lpsn gene: in vivo evidence for a dominant negative mutation. J Immunol, 162:5666-70. (PubMed:10229796)



Go Annotations in Tabular Form (Text View) (GO Graph)

 
 


Gene Ontology Evidence Code Abbreviations:

  EXP Inferred from experiment
  IC Inferred by curator
  IDA Inferred from direct assay
  IEA Inferred from electronic annotation
  IGI Inferred from genetic interaction
  IMP Inferred from mutant phenotype
  IPI Inferred from physical interaction
  ISS Inferred from sequence or structural similarity
  ISO Inferred from sequence orthology
  ISA Inferred from sequence alignment
  ISM Inferred from sequence model
  NAS Non-traceable author statement
  ND No biological data available
  RCA Reviewed computational analysis
  TAS Traceable author statement


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Mouse Genome Database (MGD), Gene Expression Database (GXD), Mouse Tumor Biology (MTB), Gene Ontology (GO), MouseCyc
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last database update
11/18/2014
MGI 5.20
The Jackson Laboratory