About   Help   FAQ
Gene Ontology Classifications
Symbol
Name
ID
Smarcb1
SWI/SNF related, matrix associated, actin dependent regulator of chromatin, subfamily b, member 1
MGI:1328366

Go Annotations as Summary Text (Tabular View) (GO Graph)

GO curators for mouse genes have assigned the following annotations to the gene product of Smarcb1. (This text reflects annotations as of Thursday, July 24, 2014.) MGI curation of this mouse gene is considered complete, including annotations derived from the biomedical literature as of December 13, 2007. If you know of any additional information regarding this mouse gene please let us know. Please supply mouse gene symbol and a PubMed ID.
Summary from NCBI RefSeq


[Summary is not available for the mouse gene. This summary is for the human ortholog.] The protein encoded by this gene is part of a complex that relieves repressive chromatin structures, allowing the transcriptional machinery to access its targets more effectively. The encoded nuclear protein may also bind to and enhance the DNA joining activity of HIV-1 integrase. This gene has been found to be a tumor suppressor, and mutations in it have been associated with malignant rhabdoid tumors. Two transcript variants encoding different isoforms have been found for this gene. [provided by RefSeq, Jul 2008]
Summary text based on GO annotations supported by experimental evidence in mouse
Summary text based on GO annotations supported by experimental evidence in other organisms
Summary text based on GO annotations supported by structural data
Summary text for additional MGI annotations
References
  1. Bultman SJ et al. (2005) A Brg1 mutation that uncouples ATPase activity from chromatin remodeling reveals an essential role for SWI/SNF-related complexes in beta-globin expression and erythroid development. Genes Dev, 19:2849-61. (PubMed:16287714)
  2. Costa Y et al. (2006) Mouse MAELSTROM: the link between meiotic silencing of unsynapsed chromatin and microRNA pathway? Hum Mol Genet, 15:2324-34. (PubMed:16787967)
  3. Gresh L et al. (2005) The SWI/SNF chromatin-remodeling complex subunit SNF5 is essential for hepatocyte differentiation. EMBO J, 24:3313-24. (PubMed:16138077)
  4. Guidi CJ et al. (2001) Disruption of ini1 leads to peri-implantation lethality and tumorigenesis in mice. Mol Cell Biol, 21:3598-603. (PubMed:11313485)
  5. Klochendler-Yeivin A et al. (2000) The murine SNF5/INI1 chromatin remodeling factor is essential for embryonic development and tumor suppression. EMBO Rep, 1:500-6. (PubMed:11263494)
  6. Lessard J et al. (2007) An essential switch in subunit composition of a chromatin remodeling complex during neural development. Neuron, 55:201-15. (PubMed:17640523)
  7. Roberts CW et al. (2000) Haploinsufficiency of snf5 (integrase interactor 1) predisposes to malignant rhabdoid tumors in mice Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A, 97:13796-800. (PubMed:11095756)
  8. Sohn DH et al. (2007) SRG3 interacts directly with the major components of the SWI/SNF chromatin remodeling complex and protects them from proteasomal degradation. J Biol Chem, 282:10614-24. (PubMed:17255092)



Go Annotations in Tabular Form (Text View) (GO Graph)

 
 


Gene Ontology Evidence Code Abbreviations:

  EXP Inferred from experiment
  IC Inferred by curator
  IDA Inferred from direct assay
  IEA Inferred from electronic annotation
  IGI Inferred from genetic interaction
  IMP Inferred from mutant phenotype
  IPI Inferred from physical interaction
  ISS Inferred from sequence or structural similarity
  ISO Inferred from sequence orthology
  ISA Inferred from sequence alignment
  ISM Inferred from sequence model
  NAS Non-traceable author statement
  ND No biological data available
  RCA Reviewed computational analysis
  TAS Traceable author statement


Contributing Projects:
Mouse Genome Database (MGD), Gene Expression Database (GXD), Mouse Tumor Biology (MTB), Gene Ontology (GO), MouseCyc
Citing These Resources
Funding Information
Warranty Disclaimer & Copyright Notice
Send questions and comments to User Support.
last database update
09/09/2014
MGI 5.19
The Jackson Laboratory