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Gene Ontology Classifications
Symbol
Name
ID
Lfng
LFNG O-fucosylpeptide 3-beta-N-acetylglucosaminyltransferase
MGI:1095413

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GO curators for mouse genes have assigned the following annotations to the gene product of Lfng. (This text reflects annotations as of Thursday, July 24, 2014.)
Summary from NCBI RefSeq


[Summary is not available for the mouse gene. This summary is for the human ortholog.] This gene is a member of the fringe gene family which also includes radical and manic fringe genes. They all encode evolutionarily conserved glycosyltransferases that act in the Notch signaling pathway to define boundaries during embryonic development. While their genomic structure is distinct from other glycosyltransferases, fringe proteins have a fucose-specific beta-1,3-N-acetylglucosaminyltransferase activity that leads to elongation of O-linked fucose residues on Notch, which alters Notch signaling. This gene product is predicted to be a single-pass type II Golgi membrane protein but it may also be secreted and proteolytically processed like the related proteins in mouse and Drosophila (PMID: 9187150). Mutations in this gene have been associated with autosomal recessive spondylocostal dysostosis 3. Multiple transcript variants encoding different isoforms have been found for this gene. [provided by RefSeq, Oct 2009]
Summary text based on GO annotations supported by experimental evidence in mouse
Summary text based on GO annotations supported by experimental evidence in other organisms
Summary text based on GO annotations supported by structural data
Summary text for additional MGI annotations
References
  1. Ferjentsik Z et al. (2009) Notch is a critical component of the mouse somitogenesis oscillator and is essential for the formation of the somites. PLoS Genet, 5:e1000662. (PubMed:19779553)
  2. Hahn KL et al. (2005) Lunatic fringe null female mice are infertile due to defects in meiotic maturation. Development, 132:817-28. (PubMed:15659488)
  3. Shifley ET et al. (2008) Oscillatory lunatic fringe activity is crucial for segmentation of the anterior but not posterior skeleton. Development, 135:899-908. (PubMed:18234727)
  4. Sparrow DB et al. (2006) Mutation of the LUNATIC FRINGE gene in humans causes spondylocostal dysostosis with a severe vertebral phenotype. Am J Hum Genet, 78:28-37. (PubMed:16385447)
  5. Yang LT et al. (2005) Fringe glycosyltransferases differentially modulate Notch1 proteolysis induced by Delta1 and Jagged1. Mol Biol Cell, 16:927-42. (PubMed:15574878)
  6. Zhang N et al. (2002) Segmentation defects of Notch pathway mutants and absence of a synergistic phenotype in lunatic fringe/radical fringe double mutant mice. Genesis, 33:21-8. (PubMed:12001066)



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Gene Ontology Evidence Code Abbreviations:

  EXP Inferred from experiment
  IC Inferred by curator
  IDA Inferred from direct assay
  IEA Inferred from electronic annotation
  IGI Inferred from genetic interaction
  IMP Inferred from mutant phenotype
  IPI Inferred from physical interaction
  ISS Inferred from sequence or structural similarity
  ISO Inferred from sequence orthology
  ISA Inferred from sequence alignment
  ISM Inferred from sequence model
  NAS Non-traceable author statement
  ND No biological data available
  RCA Reviewed computational analysis
  TAS Traceable author statement


Contributing Projects:
Mouse Genome Database (MGD), Gene Expression Database (GXD), Mouse Tumor Biology (MTB), Gene Ontology (GO), MouseCyc
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last database update
09/23/2014
MGI 5.19
The Jackson Laboratory