Mouse Genome Informatics
tg1
    Tg(Thy1-APPSweLon)41Ema/0
involves: C57BL/6 * DBA/2
Key:
phenotype observed in females WTSI Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute
phenotype observed in males EuPh Europhenome
N normal phenotype
nervous system
• progressive loss of synaptophysin-immunoreactive presynaptic terminals in the frontal cortex beginning at 3-4 months of age and in the hippocampus beginning at 5-7 months of age
• dense amyloid deposits are seen in the frontal cortex, but not in other brain areas, at 3-4 months of age
• by 5-7 months of age, an increase in size and numbers of plaques in the frontal cortex is seen and dense amyloid deposits are seen in the subiculum of the hippocampus, thalamus, and olfactory region
• at 9-11 months of age, extensive amyloid deposits are seen in most of the neocortex, hippocampus, thalamus, and cerebellum
• amyloid deposition is seen around blood vessels and in the pial surface, accompanied by astrogliosis and microgliosis
• most plaques have abundant extracellular amyloid fibrils surrounded by dystrophic neurites containing abundant electrodense laminar bodies, vesicles and synapses
• amyloid beta 1-42 is the most abundant species

other phenotype
• dense amyloid deposits are seen in the frontal cortex, but not in other brain areas, at 3-4 months of age
• by 5-7 months of age, an increase in size and numbers of plaques in the frontal cortex is seen and dense amyloid deposits are seen in the subiculum of the hippocampus, thalamus, and olfactory region
• at 9-11 months of age, extensive amyloid deposits are seen in most of the neocortex, hippocampus, thalamus, and cerebellum
• amyloid deposition is seen around blood vessels and in the pial surface, accompanied by astrogliosis and microgliosis
• most plaques have abundant extracellular amyloid fibrils surrounded by dystrophic neurites containing abundant electrodense laminar bodies, vesicles and synapses
• amyloid beta 1-42 is the most abundant species

hematopoietic system

immune system

Mouse Models of Human Disease
OMIM IDRef(s)
Alzheimer Disease; AD 104300 J:162842